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Author: innograin

Leavening Agents or Baking Powders

Leavening Agents or Baking Powders

Leavening agents, or chemical leaveners, are blends of additives that, when they react, release gas, which can be trapped by doughs, increasing the volume of the final product. They are also known as chemical yeast or baking powder. As we will see, leavening agents are used in a multitude of products, such as many batter-based recipes (muffins, cakes, etc.), cookies, or some types of bread. They can also be used in batters or other products. Generally, leavening agents are composed…

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Flavours

Flavours

In the food industry, the use of flavourings in various formulations is quite common. In this entry, we will analyse the use of these products in the production of baked goods and some aspects to consider when choosing them. First of all, it should be noted that although we usually refer to them as aromas, some of them are also complemented by substances that can affect the taste of the products, either by adding a touch of acidity, sweetness, bitterness,…

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Preservatives and Bread Preservation

Preservatives and Bread Preservation

In this entry, we will discuss additives that help prolong the shelf life of bread. However, before delving into these, it is essential to understand why bread deteriorates. Bread Ageing Processes Bread undergoes three distinct ageing phenomena. Firstly, there is a change in the bread’s texture. Secondly, microbial growth may occur. Lastly, the aroma of the bread may change, either due to the loss of typical components or the rancidity of fats. The latter effect is generally overlooked, as it…

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HYDROCOLLOIDS AND GUMS II

HYDROCOLLOIDS AND GUMS II

We previously discussed hydrocolloids in a prior post. In this new entry, we will cover some of their primary applications in the production of baked goods, such as breads, cakes, and others. Wheat Breads In bread making, hydrocolloids can assist in several ways. Firstly, they increase the water absorption of flours, allowing the dough to incorporate more water. Additionally, they improve dough stability during kneading, meaning the dough is less prone to over-kneading. Lastly, they also enhance stability during fermentation….

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Hydrocolloids and Gums I

Hydrocolloids and Gums I

The word colloid refers to a substance that has an affinity (tends to adhere) to another. Therefore, a hydrocolloid is a substance with a high affinity for water and tends to bind with it. Although proteins and starches can also be considered hydrocolloids, in this entry, we will discuss substances with a greater capacity to bind water and are usually considered food additives. We will see that there are a large number of hydrocolloids with multiple functionalities and from multiple…

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Vital Gluten

Vital Gluten

We have already discussed the importance of gluten in baking and the need to use stronger flours (with more and better quality gluten) in some instances. In addition to the gluten present in the flour, you can buy and add gluten separately. This dry, powdered gluten is commonly called vital gluten, which we will discuss in this entry. Vital Gluten From wheat flours, using a process known as wet milling, starch and gluten can be separated, and after drying and…

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Micronized Flours and Protein Concentrates

Micronized Flours and Protein Concentrates

The particle size of flours depends on the hardness of the grain and the milling system. Generally, softer grains tend to produce finer flours, while harder grains result in coarser flours. However, the milling system can be designed to further reduce particle size. For harder grains, this translates into greater heating of the samples and a higher percentage of damaged starch, especially if the milling system is not well designed. Soft cereals, such as wheat and rye, typically produce white…

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Thermally Treated Flours

Thermally Treated Flours

These flours have the advantage of altering their functionality or enhancing certain characteristics without the need for declaration on the labelling, as they are produced through physical modifications. Thus, they do not provide competitors with clues to copy or imitate the products in which they are incorporated. Grains can undergo thermal treatment before milling to modify the properties of the flours. Similarly, the flours themselves can also be thermally treated. The properties of the resulting flours depend on the intensity…

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Flour Fortification (or Enrichment)

Flour Fortification (or Enrichment)

Flour fortification is the practice whereby flour is mixed with certain substances of nutritional interest. Why? Answering this question is not as straightforward as it may seem, and it is first necessary to delve into history. Flour fortification, at least when mandated by law, originated in England during the Second World War. The English government realized that a portion of the population was at risk of suffering from certain nutritional deficiencies due to the scarcity of certain foods. To address…

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Sourdough

Sourdough

The main purpose of this entry is to discuss sourdough and the interest in using it in breadmaking. What is a sourdough? Essentially, a sourdough is a wild culture of microorganisms, more or less cared for and maintained over time. Sourdough begins with a mixture of flour and water, incorporating microorganisms from the water, flour, environment, and surfaces where they are prepared. These sourdoughs may include some salt, and the flours may vary in extraction level or include other grains…

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